Monday, December 29, 2014

Happy New Year


The last light of Summer Solstice passed and the end of year fast approaches. I hope you are enjoying a lovely festive season with family and friends.

Thank you all for a great year in 2014.....
For your support and encouragement, for turning up at exhibitions and wishing me well. To those who joined in outdoor creative activities and shared experiences in the studio, it was so lovely to see what you were up to. To the galleries and staff who work hard to show works, offer opportunities and support interest in creative developments - Thank you! To family, colleagues, friends - new and old, supporters and readers - Thank you. Art wouldn't be the same without you - Wishing you a great New Year in 2015.

Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Collectibles IV at SGAR

'Rich and Rare'  ©2014, Nicola Moss. Courtesy of SGAR.

Spiro | Grace Art Rooms would like to invite you to celebrate the year past and the year to come with Christmas cocktails on Saturday, December 6 at 5pm. 'Collectibles IV' will feature a selection of artists from 2014 and will see the introduction of their 2015 program. The exhibition marks their fifth year of operation and the end of the second year in a beautiful architecturally designed project space.

Exhibiting artists include Sue Beyer, Charles Robb, Svenja Kratz, Simon Degroot, Megan Cope, Sophie Bottomley, Franz Ehmann, Camille Serisier, Simone Eisler, Michelle Eskola and Jan Van Dijk, Gerwyn Davies and myself.


'Rich and Rare' pictured above is one of three new hand cut paperworks I have in the group exhibition. Themes of city and nature are evident in the works, incorporating inspiration from our travel to Japan this year where I bought some beautiful papers. 

Wednesday, November 12, 2014

Your favourite tree?

Having an open studio during my residency at Grafton Regional Gallery invited many informal conversations with visitors. I would inevitably ask them about their favourite tree in Grafton. There were some clear stand outs, in particular the large White Fig (Ficus virens) on the corner of Prince and Victoria Streets. Planted around 1880 this giant of a tree reaches well across the width of Grafton's extra wide streets casting cool shade under its green umbrella. The camera doesn't really capture its scale.

Jacaranda's, naturally, had several mentions, sometimes a particular tree that stood more alone was distinguished. And then there were comments on Silky Oak and Flame trees, along with the large row of figs on Breimba Street, another cool shady green sanctuary. I was stopped in the street and asked what the Tulipwood trees were, perhaps photographing trees gave away my interest.
When I first arrived in Grafton the Tabebuia were in full flower with bells of golden yellow filling the branches and making carpets below. By the time my residency ended the Poinciana trees were bursting with new leaf and flowers just emerging.


In the last week I photographed several Lacebark trees along Bacon Street, they were a standout for me, I just love the form of the tree with it's pink bell flowers. And one other curious tree will remain memorable, not so much because of its species, paperbark, more for the two metre cloak of nature strip grass which it wore.


There is one more tree I'd like to mention, a rare species in cultivation, the White Lace Flower (Archidendron hendersonii) on Duke Street, had its beautiful puffball flowers on display. These are only a selection of the street trees I saw in flower. Do you have a favourite?


Friday, November 7, 2014

Out of the studio


I had a great day on Tuesday when I joined local artist Sue Harris, who invited me to go with her, on an outing to see fauna survey work in a local reserve. We met with a ranger and two ecologists on site to see what had been caught in the traps set overnight. Seeing the wildlife up-close was fantastic. Each animal was handled so delicately during its identification for the survey. The landscape was beautiful with sandstone ridges, grass trees and a rock-bed creek of interspersed pools. We heard frog croak and saw various burrows, along with a couple of lace monitor. It's not often that I would have an opportunity to join in an outing like this, not just to see the scientific work that is being undertaken, but also to partake in the conversation that occur around subjects of environment.
Thank you Sue, it was so good!


Escapees



During my residency I've enjoyed spending time walking around the streets of Grafton photographing elements of the natural and built environment. I've noticed many trees have outgrown their initial curb or ground enclosure. Some tree roots sprawl across bitumen, rippling the ground surface, while co-occupying or competing with parking space. I find the edge of environments interesting, the place where two different zones cross over, in permaculture this zone is an area of higher diversity. In a street scape I imagine it could be a place where values are weighed up - the tree or the carpark?

Monday, November 3, 2014

In the studio


Work is starting to come together on the wall of the studio at Grafton Regional Gallery. I'm at the end of week three in my residency, with one week to go. It's always interesting to be somewhere you don't know and experience the place and community - I think of it as being a sense of 'fresh eyes'. Nothing is that familiar so I tend to see everything equally, so to speak. Four weeks is a good length of time to get a feel for a place, I can't 'know' it, but connections and ideas develop, often unexpectedly.
Sound is something that has put me outside of my comfort zone during the residency. Before I came I was thinking of Grafton as being in regional Australia, a country town, and hadn't quite grasped the suburban town-ness of being in an apartment on Fitzroy Street. Where I live and work on the Gold Coast is very quiet, silence is a common experience during my days there. I hadn't realised how much of a sanctuary that place is, removed really from a lot of the day to day activities of community. Grafton has ignited many thoughts about community, participation, and what it means to live in town. I won't miss the street sweeper at 4.30am every morning, but I am aware of being far more engaged with community life and its emotions. Plenty for me to contemplate....this has been in part a 'fresh ears' experience.

I would like to Thank very much Grafton Regional Art Gallery for supporting my artist residency, with generous funding from Arts NSW. The residency has been a unique experience, I'm looking forward to the next week.

Grafton Ecology


The collection of vegetation, seeds and flowers continues to grow in the studio space. Making interesting reference material for work in progress, along with a few tools for mark making.

Silk postcards

A little follow up on the historic needlework cards I saw last week. I was looking at the Australian War Memorial website and found they have a substantial collection of the needlework, which were embroidered on silk as postcards, peaking in popularity during the First World War. They were mostly hand embroidered by French women in their homes and sent to factories for cutting and mounting as postcards. Sent home to loved ones, I can imagine the messages avoided speaking about the realities of war.

Friday, October 31, 2014

The bridge


This post is for Deb.
I took my first walk across the historic Grafton Bridge this week. It has two decks with road traffic above and railway and pedestrian below. There is a lot of history and engineering in the bridge which you can read about here.
I enjoyed the experience of crossing the river, it's big and one of the reasons Grafton came to be, that and the timber that was first harvested from the area. I disturbed several pigeons on my walk, the bridge is home to hundreds? I'm guessing from their deposits. The textures of the bridge are great, rusted metal, weathered wood, and archways of red brick underneath at each end. The breeze of fresh air, watching water flowing strongly below railway lines and listening to rumble of unseen traffic above makes it an experience of senses.

Flowers and memory


I came to Grafton on my residency to look at the ecology and trees of this historic city, and think about how the community engages or relates to the environment around them. During my time here I have seen many connections to the flowers of the trees and of course most evident the Jacaranda Festival celebrations that are timed to coincide with its flowering.
During the week I headed to South Grafton to look at the Jacaranda Embroidery Group's Biennial Exhibition of needlework. What really caught my eye was the Remembrance display of needlework. The poppy flower displayed in crochet was very striking, but even more intriguing I found were the historic needlework with messages of luck, hope and celebration. They all feature natural elements in flowers, vegetation, birds and landscape. Flowers have so many cultural associations of remembrance, celebration, home, thanks and the simple pleasure of perfume and visual beauty. Plenty to think about while I am here.

Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Open Gardens


As part of the Grafton Jacaranda Festival several local gardens are open to visitors, I headed out this morning to see the flowers. I have seen Grafton as a city of flowers as much as it is a city of trees. Bromeliads, hippeastrum, roses, succulents and annuals were all well represented, along with shade giving palms, water features and ornaments. I saw plenty of reused materials and creative hanging plants.

Jacaranda Festival weekend


There has been so much happening in town this weekend with the 80th Annual Grafton Jacaranda Festival. Saturday morning started with the parade of youth and banner competition. Led by the 22 piece Royal Australian Navy Band down Prince Street, I enjoyed the atmosphere and seeing the kids school banners celebrating the festival. Later in the evening I joined a large portion of the community to watch the Jacaranda Queen Crowning event. The dancing entertainment was great with 80 years of festival interpreted in 80 years of dance, seeing Abba followed by Michael Jackson was classic.
The whole evening had a lovely festive, community feel, I can't remember the last time I was at a country fair. The 2014 Jacaranda Queen was crowned amidst much tradition and ceremony, congratulations to Emily Causley.

In between events I spent the weekend working in the studio and meeting visitors to the gallery. It's nice to have an opportunity to share experiences of Grafton and to hear thoughts on the work developing.

Friday, October 24, 2014

Grafton ecology

Out and about on my walk this morning taking rubbings of trees and collecting fallen blooms. The studio collection of textures and various flora is growing steadily. I had great fun this week working with a large palm tree seed sprout to make marks on paper while 'thinking tree' and looking at some reference photos. It was the feel or experience of tree that I had in mind. The resulting marks have created a lovely tonal quality of organic and spontaneous energy.
This week I noticed a Mexican Tree Fern flowering at See Park and collected a number of fallen flower stems, I suspect birds have been doing their damage. The chartreuse stems and yellow open flowers were off-set with the dark black brown outer capsule of the closed flower buds, still to open.

Today I worked over a lot of my earlier coloured papers to develop a harmonious palette of Grafton. Hopefully when I look again tomorrow morning it will still gel together.

Tuesday, October 21, 2014

In the studio


It's the start of week two of my residency. Ideas are beginning to take shape in the studio space at Grafton Regional Gallery. Today I was keen to get some images on the wall and start cutting paper stencils. The ecology collection is gradually growing, will show more of this when further samples are gathered.
The branches in bottles came from under a large Cook Pine, which the lovely group at Clarence River Historical Society informed me is the oldest planted tree in Grafton.
Lots of streets still to walk and explore, will post more updates as the work progresses.

Grafton Garden Club


Last night I had a lovely evening at the Grafton Garden Club monthly meeting. The first thing I noticed when I entered the hall were the flowers. Each one brought from a members garden in a green bottle with roses, clematis, orchids, hibiscus, and natives. Later in the evening everyone present voted on groups of the flowers to select a favourite, with a special prize at the end of the year.
I asked members if any may be interested in volunteering their gardens for me to spend some time in, photographing and observing for some possible artwork, thanks to those who agreed.
Next weekend and through the following week, as part of the Jacaranda Festival, a number of gardens in and around Grafton are open to the public for viewing.
Thank you to Helen, Joy, Yvonne, Noelene, Kim, Rosie, Lyn, Mavis, and all the other members who made me feel welcome and for sharing your stories of Grafton. Looking forward to seeing the gardens!

Monday, October 20, 2014

Culture on the Clarence

Sunday awoke to another beautiful clear sunny sky in Grafton. I headed over to South Grafton for one of the Jacaranda festival's first events - Culture on the Clarence, a community fair celebrating local talent, musicians, indigenous heritage and community groups. It was a lovely mix of stalls and activity along the heritage shopping area of Skinner Street.
I photographed much of the lead lighting in older buildings and chatted with local artist, Rochelle Summerfield.
The town crier, in attendance with some of the Jacaranda Queen candidates, added jolly cheer to the atmosphere.
The river end of Skinner Street has tranquil views of Susan Island in the middle of the Clarence River and Grafton beyond. It was a lovely morning.

Flowering Street Trees - Grafton

Mid spring is a lovely time of year for seeing the flowering street trees of Grafton. Apart from the mauve haze of Jacaranda which the town is synonymous with, there are other bold splashes in yellow - Tabebuia and Silky Oak; Red - Flame tree and Tree Waratah; along with white jacaranda, pink clusters of white cedar and numerous others.

 


A poem by M. Beckman of Grafton:
 
Flower-laden spring
 
Arrayed in soft tones of green, purple and gold.
The City of Grafton is fair to behold;
And soon, now, her bright festive songs she will sing.
The year has again brought sweet flower-laden spring
And festival time to this city of flowers.
Whose petals fall soft like continuous showers.
Soon moonlight will gleam with her silvery light.
On Grafton at play, a fair, glamorous sight.

JADA 2014

Friday night was the opening of the 2014 Jacaranda Acquisitive Drawing Award. It was a lovely evening to meet artists and view the 50 finalists contemporary drawing works. This years judge, John McDonald, art critic for the Sydney Morning Herald, chose the work of Mullumbimby artist, Emma Walker, as the winner of the $20,000 award. You can read about John's selection process here.
Emma's work titled 'Keys bridge in flood' is full of energy and layering, bringing in and out of focus elements of the landscape.

Another $20,000 in acquisitions for the Grafton Regional Gallery's collection were also selected. In conjunction with JADA a two day Drawing Symposium was held over the weekend. With speakers, a drawing performance with Kellie O'Dempsey and several workshops; the event had a great vibe and lots of interesting conversations ensued.

JADA will be on exhibition from 17th October to 7th December, 2014 followed by a tour to seven regional and metropolitan galleries until mid 2016.

Friday, October 17, 2014

Jacaranda City


On Tuesday with the car packed and a clear sunny sky I headed on my way to Grafton for a residency at the Grafton Regional Gallery. The drive was scenic with cane fields and forest; ending with a crossing of the Clarence River historic bridge, negotiating its bends and then into the tree lined streets of town. This was my first visit to Grafton Regional Gallery, situated in Prentice House, built in 1880 by Alexander Fairweather. Surrounded by beautiful gardens, with a semi-enclosed rear courtyard shaded by tree; it will be a tranquil location for working in.
I unpacked materials in the studio space, a large room with views of the courtyard. Then headed to my accommodation with the usual logistics of unpacking, grocery shopping and a good nights sleep.
Looking forward to exploring the streets tomorrow, soaking up the trees and heritage.



Wednesday, October 8, 2014

In the studio


Responding to the spontaneity of the creative urge is something I have learnt to accommodate, or perhaps I should say harness...to the best of my attempts at least. It just happens - a new thought connects ideas and there it is - a series of work to be developed, or the idea of a colour and a series of works, you get the idea. Green has been in my mind; today I got around to mixing some colour. I was thinking of the State Library in Brisbane green, the one used on the concrete walls; it's a lovely almost retro green, patchy and visceral in its qualities.
So tonight I've been recycling some paper pieces and loosely developing shades of green....there are so many greens.
For the last few weeks I've been working in the studio on a commission piece and next week I head to Grafton for my residency at Grafton Regional Art Gallery. Time to get back to the papers :-)

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Moerenuma Park - SIAF 2014

As part of the Sapporo International Art Festival we took a day trip to Moerenuma Park. Wow! What an amazing park. Designed by Isamu Noguchi, the park itself is considered to be one complete sculpture. With various large mounds, play mountains, water features, tree groves and bicycle tracks, it's hard to describe the expansive scale. From the top of Mt. Moere panoramic views of Sapporo city and suburbs are in clear view, that's after you climb the 390 steps to reach the top, well worth the effort. From the high points the park reveals itself as a connected pattern of triangular and geometric shapes surrounded by a water moat.
After walking around for a few hours we took a break for lunch and then hired bicycles to ride around the shaded tree lanes. The glass pyramid 'Hidamari' is visually striking and hosted several contemporary installation works as part of the art fair. The architectural structure contrasted beautifully with overhead organic clouds.

I must mention (and recommend) lunch was a most pleasant surprise when we came across Restaurant L'Enfant qui reve, with French/Japanese fine dining, we indulged in a delicious degustation. Desert and coffee was taken in a separate room where we sat alone and took in views of the gardens. A great day trip if you are visiting Sapporo.

Monday, September 15, 2014

Last weeks for Culture Ecology at BRAG

'Time capsule 1'  ©2014 Nicola Moss, Synthetic polymer paint, rust stain, water colour, hand cut paper.

It's the final two weeks for Culture Ecology on show at Bathurst Regional Art Gallery. If you couldn't make it to the area or missed out on a room sheet while visiting, details are now available on-line.

It will be two years since I completed my residency at Hill End, while I think about the memories of that place, I'm also looking forward to spending time exploring the ecology of Grafton next month, on a residency that coincides with the Jacaranda Festival, celebrating its 80th anniversary.

The Grafton Regional Gallery Artist in Residence program is open to professional artists and curators from all disciplines. The program generously supports artists' new work, research and collaborations.

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Sapporo International Art Festival - Japan

Views from our walk over Toyohira River into town at Sapporo.
As some of you may know, my travel to Japan last month was related to my husband's Ironman sporting activities. With positions often selling out in the races within days, travel is booked up to a year in advance. Given this I was absolutely delighted to find out a few months after booking that Sapporo would be hosting its International Art Festival while we were there....serendipity!

SIAF 2014 is being held as part of the Creative City Sapporo initiative, from July 19 to September 28, 2014, under the stewardship of Guest Director and globally renowned artist Ryuichi Sakamoto. The theme of the event is City and Nature - great fit with my practice, and an opportunity to see contemporary artists exploring how cities can coexist with nature in the future.

We were away for two weeks in the north island of Hokkaido, with five days in the rural race area of Lake Toya and the remaining time in Sapporo. This gave me plenty of time to check out almost all of the art festival venues and see some great art. I'll say now that for me the highlight of Japan (this being my first time there) was the people. I found them incredibly polite and helpful, sometimes going to extraordinary lengths, and very humble, all admirable qualities. Shuttle buses to two major venues in the outer suburbs were punctual to the minute, making it very easy to tell if we were catching the right bus. And with plenty of signs, brochures and volunteer helpers available, it was a very well organised festival.

I had a bit of an idea of some of the art I would see at the festival, such is the internet, but was also pleasantly surprised, particularly with textiles.


Ainu Textiles were on display in the festival venue Sapporo Eki-mae dori Underground Walkway - and instantly caught my eye with their striking patterns and tonal contrast. Beautifully hand stitched, the stunning patterns are said to ward off evil spirits, and have been handed down from mother to daughter for generations. I saw several more examples of Ainu textiles in Sapporo and contemporary examples of artists working with these traditional craft forms.

Paper and wood were other material highlights, with Japanese artists highlighting the natural surface and aesthetic qualities in often subtle and minimal ways...it was definitely a 'less is more approach' in many works.


Takashi Kuribayashi's paper forest (above) titled 'Wald aus Wald (Forest from Forest)' 2010 was one of these works. We had a lot of fun engaging with this installation and at the same time admiring the creative skill and concept. On display at the Sapporo Art Museum, the white forest is made of Japanese washi paper that is itself made from trees. For more images and installation shots, check out this post on designboom.

Thursday, September 4, 2014

More Gold Coast

'Coast Life' (detail), Nicola Moss. Image from the website More Gold Coast.

It's almost a year since the new Gold Coast University Hospital opened at Southport. So it was a pleasant surprise to come across a lovely post last week on the More Gold Coast site. Written by Megan Reading, the article speaks about benefits of having artworks integrated into the hospital environment, with a really lovely mention of my public artwork on the atrium lift shaft (at the end, I missed the scroll down the first time, Thanks Deb :-)).

This was a fantastic project I enjoyed working on a lot and was made possible with the assistance of many people, with special thanks to Renai Grace, art curator; and Stacie Gibson, lead designer.

Must get back and check it out in the flesh again some time.

Monday, September 1, 2014

Art show openings on the Sunshine Coast

'Life on the edge - Girt by sea'  ©2014, Nicola Moss. Courtesy of SGAR.
 
There has been plenty happening in the last week. While I was away travelling, both the Sunshine Coast Art Prize and the Noosa Art Award opened. It was disappointing to not be able to be there on the nights, but I'm not complaining too much.....the trip to Japan was fabulous (posts coming soon).

My hand paper cut work - 'Resource Ecology ( Conserve-Develop)' received a commended mention at SCAP by judge Chris Saines, Director of QAGOMA. The exhibition is on show at Caloundra Regional Gallery and continues until 26th October if you are in the area. The forty finalists works can also be seen online, and there is a People's Choice vote and prize if you feel inclined to choose a favourite work.

A couple of nights later at the Noosa Art Award my hand cut paper installation 'Life on the edge - Girt by Sea' received a Highly Commended Award. Special thanks to Marguerite who collected the award on my behalf. Congratulations to Simone Eisler for winning the overall prize.

In conjunction with the award, Noosa Regional Gallery is hosting a panel discussion by Noosa Art Award finalists on Friday 5th September, between 10.30 and 11.30 am. I'm looking forward to seeing the show and catching up with anyone who can make it on the morning.

There is a people's choice award and prize with this show too, if you feel like voting for a favourite artwork. The winner is announced on Friday 26th September, and the exhibition continues until Sunday 5th October.

Monday, August 11, 2014

Artist in residence - Grafton Regional Gallery


I've started reading about the history of Grafton's Jacaranda Festival in preparation for my residency in October at Grafton Regional Gallery. Experiencing the Jacaranda Festival first hand will be inspiring, while it celebrates its 80th year, Australia's longest continuing Floral Festival.
As many of you would know I have a passion for trees. There is something special about grand trees, the mature specimens planted long before I was born that will live long after I am gone. My art practice often celebrates the heritage and cultural connections communities have with trees, whether they be street trees or in nature reserves. I'm thinking about connections and the value people feel for particular trees. In a contemporary context, does this translate to caring about environment more generally.
Back to reading for now.
With Thanks to the Clarence River visitor information centre and Grafton Jacaranda Festival Committee for their assistance.

Monday, August 4, 2014

Culture Ecology on show at BRAG


The exhibition openings at Bathurst Regional Art Gallery on the weekend were lovely. A great combination of works on show, artists talks, meeting people and time for travel through the stunning landscapes I worked in during my 2012 residencies.
The opening night began with an artist talk by Jason Benjamin about his practice and the development of landscape works in his solo show 'Everyone is here'. Incorporating pencil drawings, wash works on paper and large scale paintings, it gives an insight into his practice and keen observation of topography and vegetation.

My show 'Culture Ecology' opened along with fellow 2012 residents, Kathryn Orton - 'Hill End Panorama' and Renuka Fernando - 'Disturbing the surface'. These exhibitions worked very well together, each of us manipulating and working with paper in response to our experiences of Hill End, but with diverse results. It was lovely to meet and share memories of the time with Kathryn and Renuka.


On Saturday Gavin Wilson recounted the great story of how the Hill End Artist in Residence Program developed, and magnetic attraction the area has held for artists since the 1940's. His talk accompanied the Bathurst Regional Art Gallery Collection exhibition - The Third Wave: Two decades of the Hill End Artists in Residence Program. With a diverse selection of works by artists including Donald Friend, Jean Bellette, Tom Spence, Richard Goodwin and Julie Ryder.

I must give special thanks to the installation team at Bathurst Regional Art Gallery, who had a huge week and took on the challenge of pining my large installation work, Making Home - softening the edges, not an easy task! Thank you - you have done a great job. You can see images of the installation team and Renuka hard at work on each of the shows here on the BRAG Facebook Page.


Thanks again to Bathurst Regional Art Gallery for their ongoing support of the exhibition and residency program, it has been a wonderful experience and contribution to the development of my arts practice.

Thursday, July 31, 2014

Highly Commended at The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize 2014



I received a surprise in the mail this week, along with a copy of the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize catalogue was a Highly Commended Award for my hand cut paper work - Priority species (Moreton Bay). It's so lovely to receive recognition for this work.

Images of all the finalist and winning artworks can be seen on the South Australian Museum website here. And a friend (Thank you Emma) sent me a link to this image of my artwork hanging in the museum.

The winning and highly commended artworks form part of a touring exhibition that is shown at the National Archives of Australia in Canberra. If you are in the area, exhibition dates are from 26th September to 9th November 2014.

Monday, July 28, 2014

After the fires - North Stradbroke Island




Last week I headed over to North Stradbroke Island with Helena to see how the island's flora was recovering after the New Year bushfires. The landscape feels open with sand visible across hillsides amongst the charred black of tree trunks and vibrant green of regrowth. It was good to see the Banksia, Melaleuca and eucalypt re-sprouting with new growth. Even more exciting to see were the seedlings, tiny delicate new lives covering the charred ground, almost as though someone had broadcast them. Whilst witnessing the devastation it was hard to not feel buoyed by the resilience of plants.

This map from Queensland Fire and Emergency Services shows the burn areas day by day.

I'll be developing artworks for a curated exhibition in June next year, more details a bit closer to the time.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Culture Ecology opening at Bathurst Regional Art Gallery

 
I would like to extend you a warm invitation to the opening of my solo exhibition 'Culture Ecology' at Bathurst Regional Art Gallery on Friday 1st August at 6pm. The exhibition presents a body of hand cut paper artworks that respond to the ecology of Hill End, where I spent a month as artist in residence in 2012. Some previously unseen works including the 'Time Capsule' series form part of the show.
 
Exhibitions of work by Jason Benjamin, Kathryn Orton, Renuka Fernando and a curated selection from the Bathurst Regional Art Gallery's permanent collection also open on the night.
 
If you are in the Bathurst region at the end of next week it would be lovely to see you at the opening.
The exhibition continues until 28th September 2014.
 


Saturday, July 19, 2014

The Noosa Art Award

'Life on the edge - Girt by sea' (detail) ©2014, Nicola Moss. Courtesy of SGAR.

Noosa Regional Gallery on the Sunshine Coast is hosting its inaugural Noosa Art Award opening next month. With a theme of reflecting the unique character of modern Australia's coastal and hinterland environments, it felt like a perfect fit for my art practice, and I'm delighted to be selected for the finalist exhibition with my hand cut paper work - 'Life on the edge - Girt by sea'.
Some of the entry conditions required a bit of innovative thinking in relation to size and presentation of the works, so I'm looking forward to seeing how other artists have interpreted this.

The Noosa Art Award opens on Friday 29th August and is on show until Sunday 5th October 2014.

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Packing


The time arrived this week when I needed to pack my large hand cut paper installation for transport to Bathurst Regional Art Gallery, for my solo show being installed at the end of July. I realised about a week ago that this task would be best achieved with some assistance, and I'm VERY thankful that Rachael was available. It took the two of us all day...

I haven't packed this work before for interstate travel, so we tested a couple of ideas to ensure the work wouldn't slump and slide around inside the flat packs. And at the same time thinking of others who will need to unpack and repack this work for return at the end of the exhibition. I wait now to hear that it arrived safely and wasn't a nightmare to unpack!

'Making Home - softening the edges' will be on show at Bathurst Regional Art Gallery from 1st August to 28th September, 2014.

Thank you Rachael!

'Making home - softening the edges' ©2013, Nicola Moss. Courtesy of SGAR.